Risks

The Fund’s principal risks are mentioned below. Before you decide whether to invest in the Fund, carefully consider these risk factors and special considerations associated with investing in the Fund, which may cause investors to lose money.

Europac International Value Fund

  • Market Risk- The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.
  • Equity Risk- The value of the equity securities held by the Fund may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities held by the Fund participate, or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests.
  • Value-Oriented Investment Strategies Risk- Value stocks are those that are believed to be undervalued in comparison to their peers due to adverse business developments or other factors. Value investing is subject to the risk that the market will not recognize a security’s inherent value for a long time or at all, or that a stock judged to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced or overvalued. Therefore, the Fund is most suitable for long-term investors who are willing to hold their shares for extended periods of time through market fluctuations and the accompanying changes in share prices.
  • Sector Risk- From time to time, the Fund may invest up to, but less than, 25% a significant amount of its total assets in each of certain sectors of the economy. Each of those sectors may be subject to specific risks. These risks include governmental regulation of the sector and governmental monetary and fiscal policies, which may impact interest rates and currencies and affect corporate funding and international trade. Certain sectors may be more vulnerable than others to these factors. In addition, market sentiment and expectations toward a particular sector could affect a company’s market valuation and access to equity funding.
  • Finance Sector Risk- Performance of companies in the Finance sector may be adversely impacted by many factors, including, among others: government regulations of, or related to, the sector; governmental monetary and fiscal policies; economic, business or political conditions; credit rating downgrades; changes in interest rates; price competition; and decreased liquidity in credit markets. This sector has experienced significant losses and a high degree of volatility in the recent past, and the impact of more stringent capital requirements and of recent or future regulation on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted.
  • Gold Sector Risk- Investments related to gold are considered speculative and are affected by a variety of worldwide economic, financial and political factors. The price of gold may fluctuate sharply over short periods of time, even during periods of rising prices, due to changes in inflation or expectations regarding inflation in various countries, the availability of supplies, changes in industrial and commercial demand, limited markets, fabricator demand, gold sales by governments, trade imbalances and restrictions, currency devaluation or revaluation, central banks or international agencies, investment speculation, inability to raise capital, increases in production costs, political unrest in nations where sources of gold are located, monetary and other economic policies of various governments and government restrictions on private ownership of gold and mining land.
  • Foreign Investment Risk- The prices of foreign securities may be more volatile than the prices of securities of U.S. issuers because of economic and social conditions abroad, political developments, and changes in the regulatory environment of foreign countries. In addition, changes in exchange rates and interest rates may adversely affect the value of the Fund’s foreign investments. Foreign companies are generally subject to different legal and accounting standards than U.S. companies, and foreign financial intermediaries may be subject to less supervision and regulation than U.S. financial firms. Foreign securities include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). Unsponsored ADRs involve additional risks because U.S. – 4 – reporting requirements do not apply and the issuing bank will recover shareholder distribution costs from movement of share prices and payment of dividends.
  • Currency Risk- The value of investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. Dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and are affected by factors such as general economic conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls, and speculation.
  • Geographic Concentration Risk- A fund that is less diversified across countries or geographic regions is generally riskier than a more geographically diversified fund. Investments in a single region, even though representing a number of different countries within the region, may be affected by common economic forces and other factors. This vulnerability to factors affecting the value of investments is significantly greater for a fund that concentrates its investment in a particular region or regions than a more geographically diversified fund, and may result in greater losses and volatility. The economies and financial markets of certain regions, such as Latin America, Asia or Eastern Europe, can be interdependent and may decline all at the same time.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Europe- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, political and local risks of the European region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. Europe includes both developed and emerging markets. Most Western European countries are members of the European Union, which imposes restrictions on inflation rates, deficits and debt levels. Both developed and emerging market countries in Europe will be significantly affected by the fiscal and monetary controls of the European Monetary Union. Changes in regulations on trade, decreasing imports or exports, changes in the exchange rate of the euro and recessions among European countries may have a significant adverse effect on the economies of other European countries including those of Eastern Europe. The markets in Eastern Europe remain relatively undeveloped and can be particularly sensitive to political and economic developments. The European financial markets have recently experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about rising government debt levels of certain European countries, each of which may require external assistance to meet its obligations and run the risk of default on its debt, possible bail-out by the rest of the European Union or debt restructuring. Assistance given to a European Union member state may be dependent on a country’s implementation of reforms in order to curb the risk of default on its debt, and a failure to implement these reforms or increase revenues could result in a deep economic downturn. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and therefore may adversely affect the Fund and its investments.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Pacific Rim- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, regulatory, political, natural disasters and local risks of the Pacific Rim region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. The Pacific Rim region includes countries in all stages of economic development; however, it has a higher prevalence of emerging market countries as compared to other regions of the world. The region has historically been highly dependent on global trade, with nations taking strong roles in both the importing and exporting of goods; such a relationship creates a risk with this dependency on global growth. The respective stock markets tend to have a larger prevalence of smaller capitalization companies. Varying levels of accounting and disclosure standards, restrictions on foreign ownership, minority ownership rights, and corporate governance standards are also common for the region.
  • Emerging Market Risk- Many of the risks with respect to foreign investments are more pronounced for investments in issuers in developing or emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have less government exchange controls, more volatile interest and currency exchange rates, less market regulation, and less developed economic, political and legal systems than those of more developed countries. In addition, emerging market countries may experience high levels of inflation and may have less liquid securities markets and less efficient trading and settlement systems.
  • Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk- The securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements and may have lower trading volumes or more erratic trading than securities of larger, more established companies or market averages in general. In – 5 – addition, such companies typically are more likely to be adversely affected than large capitalization companies by changes in earning results, business prospects, investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions.
  • Liquidity Risk- The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value.
  • Risks Affecting Specific Issuers- The value of an equity security may decline in response to developments affecting a specific issuer, even if the overall industry or economy is unaffected. These developments may include a variety of factors, such as management problems or corporate disruption, declines in revenues and increases in costs, and factors that affect the issuer’s competitive position.
  • Preferred Stock Risk- Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stock, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. The market value of preferred stock is subject to company-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities and is also sensitive to changes in the company’s creditworthiness, the ability of the company to make payments on the preferred stock, and changes in interest rates, typically declining in value if interest rates rise.
  • Convertible Securities Risk- Convertible securities are subject to market and interest rate risk and credit risk. When the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security decreases the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its yield and other fixed income characteristics, and is more susceptible to credit and interest rate risks. When the market price of such equity security rises, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its equity conversion features and be more exposed to market risk. Convertible securities are typically issued by smaller capitalized companies with stock prices that may be more volatile than those of other companies.
  • Warrants Risk- Warrants may lack a liquid secondary market for resale. The prices of warrants may fluctuate as a result of speculation or other factors. Warrants can provide a greater potential for profit or loss than an equivalent investment in the underlying security. Prices of warrants do not necessarily move in tandem with the prices of their underlying securities and therefore are highly volatile and speculative investments.
  • Options Risk- Purchasing and writing put and call options are highly specialized activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund may not fully benefit from or may lose money on an option if changes in its value do not correspond as anticipated to changes in the value of the underlying securities. If the Fund is not able to sell an option held in its portfolio, it would have to exercise the option to realize any profit and would incur transaction costs upon the purchase or sale of the underlying securities. Ownership of options involves the payment of premiums, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. To the extent that the Fund invests in over-the-counter options, the Fund may be exposed to counterparty risk.
  • ETF Risk- Investing in an ETF will provide the Fund with exposure to the securities comprising the index on which the ETF is based and will expose the Fund to risks similar to those of investing directly in those securities. Shares of ETFs typically trade on securities exchanges and may at times trade at a premium or discount to their net asset values. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held. Investing in ETFs, which are investment companies, may involve duplication of advisory fees and certain other expenses. The Fund will pay brokerage commissions in connection with the purchase and sale of shares of ETFs. Management and
  • Strategy Risk- The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Fund’s advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Fund’s advisor in selecting – 6 – investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments.

EuroPac International Dividend Income Fund

  • Market Risk- The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived – 3 – adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. 
  • Equity Risk- The value of the equity securities held by the Fund may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities held by the Fund participate, or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. 
  • Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk- The securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements and may have lower trading volumes or more erratic trading than securities of larger, more established companies or market averages in general. In addition, such companies typically are more likely to be adversely affected than large capitalization companies by changes in earning results, business prospects, investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions. 
  • Large-Cap Company Risk- Larger, more established companies may be unable to attain the high growth rates of successful, smaller companies during periods of economic expansion. 
  • Preferred Stock Risk- Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stock, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. The market value of preferred stock is subject to company-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities and is also sensitive to changes in the company’s creditworthiness, the ability of the company to make payments on the preferred stock, and changes in interest rates, typically declining in value if interest rates rise. 
  • Geographic Concentration Risk- A fund that is less diversified across countries or geographic regions is generally riskier than a more geographically diversified fund. Investments in a single region, even though representing a number of different countries within the region, may be affected by common economic forces and other factors. This vulnerability to factors affecting the value of investments is significantly greater for a fund that concentrates its investment in a particular region or regions than a more geographically diversified fund, and may result in greater losses and volatility. The economies and financial markets of certain regions, such as Latin America, Asia or Eastern Europe, can be interdependent and may decline all at the same time. 
  • Geographic Risk related to Europe- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, regulatory, political and local risks of the European region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. Europe includes both developed and emerging markets. Most Western European countries are members of the European Union, which imposes restrictions on inflation rates, deficits and debt levels both developed and emerging market countries in Europe will be significantly affected by the fiscal and monetary controls of the European Monetary Union. Changes in regulations on trade, decreasing imports or exports, changes in the exchange rate of the euro and recessions among European countries may have a significant adverse effect on the economies of other European countries including those of Eastern Europe. The markets in Eastern Europe remain relatively undeveloped and can be particularly sensitive to political and economic developments. The European financial markets have recently experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about rising government debt levels of certain European countries, each of which may require external assistance to meet its obligations and run the risk of default on its debt, possible bail-out by the rest of the European Union or debt restructuring. Assistance given to a European Union member state may be dependent on a country’s implementation of reforms in order to curb the risk of default on its debt, and a failure to implement these reforms or increase revenues could result in a deep economic downturn. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and therefore may adversely affect the Fund and its investments. 
  • Geographic Risk Related to Pacific Rim- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, regulatory, political, natural disasters and local risks of the Pacific Rim region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. The Pacific Rim region includes countries in all stages of economic development; however, it has a higher prevalence of emerging market countries as compared to other regions of the world. The region has historically been highly dependent on global trade, with nations taking strong roles in both the – 4 – importing and exporting of goods; such a relationship creates a risk with this dependency on global growth. The respective stock markets tend to have a larger prevalence of smaller capitalization companies. Varying levels of accounting and disclosure standards, restrictions on foreign ownership, minority ownership rights, and corporate governance standards are also common for the region. 
  • Foreign Investment Risk- The prices of foreign securities may be more volatile than the prices of securities of U.S. issuers because of economic and social conditions abroad, political developments, and changes in the regulatory environment of foreign countries. In addition, changes in exchange rates and interest rates may adversely affect the value of the Fund’s foreign investments. Foreign companies are generally subject to different legal and accounting standards than U.S. companies, and foreign financial intermediaries may be subject to less supervision and regulation than U.S. financial firms. Foreign securities include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). Unsponsored ADRs involve additional risks because U.S. reporting requirements do not apply and the issuing bank will recover shareholder distribution costs from movement of share prices and payment of dividends. 
  • Emerging Market Risk- Many of the risks with respect to foreign investments are more pronounced for investments in issuers in developing or emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have less government exchange controls, more volatile interest and currency exchange rates, less market regulation, and less developed economic, political and legal systems than those of more developed countries. In addition, emerging market countries may experience high levels of inflation and may have less liquid securities markets and less efficient trading and settlement systems. 
  • Currency Risk- The value of investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. Dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and are affected by factors such as general economic conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls, and speculation. 
  • Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) Risk- The Fund’s investment in REITs will subject the Fund to risks similar to those associated with direct ownership of real estate, including losses from casualty or condemnation, and changes in local and general economics, supply and demand, interest rates, zoning laws, regulatory limitations on rents, property taxes and operating expenses. 
  • Liquidity Risk- The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value. 
  • Convertible Securities Risk- Convertible securities are subject to market and interest rate risk and credit risk. When the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security decreases the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its yield and other fixed income characteristics, and is more susceptible to credit and interest rate risks. When the market price of such equity security rises, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its equity conversion features and be more exposed to market risk. Convertible securities are typically issued by smaller capitalized companies with stock prices that may be more volatile than those of other companies. Warrants Risk. Warrants may lack a liquid secondary market for resale. The prices of warrants may fluctuate as a result of speculation or other factors. Warrants can provide a greater potential for profit or loss than an equivalent investment in the underlying security. Prices of warrants do not necessarily move in tandem with the prices of their underlying securities and therefore, are highly volatile and speculative investments. 
  • ETF Risk- Investing in an ETF will provide the Fund with exposure to the securities comprising the index on which the ETF is based and will expose the Fund to risks similar to those of investing directly in those securities. Shares of ETFs typically trade on securities exchanges and may at times trade at a premium or discount to their net asset values. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks – 5 – to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held. Investing in ETFs, which are investment companies, may involve duplication of advisory fees and certain other expenses. The Fund will pay brokerage commissions in connection with the purchase and sale of shares of ETFs. 
  • Options Risk- Purchasing and writing put and call options are highly specialized activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund may not fully benefit from or may lose money on an option if changes in its value do not correspond as anticipated to changes in the value of the underlying securities. If the Fund is not able to sell an option held in its portfolio, it would have to exercise the option to realize any profit and would incur transaction costs upon the purchase or sale of the underlying securities. Ownership of options involves the payment of premiums, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. To the extent that the Fund invests in over-the-counter options, the Fund may be exposed to counterparty risk. 
  • Management and Strategy Risk- The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Fund’s advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Fund’s advisor in selecting investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments.

EuroPac International Bond Fund 

  • Market Risk- The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.
  • Fixed Income Securities (Bond) Risk- The prices of fixed income securities respond to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to changes in an issuer’s credit rating or market perceptions about the creditworthiness of an issuer. Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, and longer-term and lower rated securities are more volatile than higher rated securities.
  • Foreign Investment Risk- The prices of foreign securities may be more volatile than the prices of securities of U.S. issuers because of economic and social conditions abroad, political developments, and changes in the regulatory environment of foreign countries. In addition, changes in exchange rates and interest rates may adversely affect the value of the Fund’s foreign investments. Foreign companies are generally subject to different legal and accounting standards than U.S. companies, and foreign financial intermediaries may be subject to less supervision and regulation than U.S. financial firms.
  • Currency Risk- The value of investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. Dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and are affected by factors such as general economic conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls, and speculation.
  • Geographic Concentration Risk- A fund that is less diversified across countries or geographic regions is generally riskier than a more geographically diversified fund. Investments in a single region, even though representing a number of different countries within the region, may be affected by common economic forces and other factors. This vulnerability to factors affecting the value of investments is significantly greater for a fund that concentrates its investment in a particular region or regions than a more geographically diversified fund, and may result in greater losses and volatility. The economies and financial markets of certain regions, such as Latin America, Asia or Eastern Europe, can be interdependent and may decline all at the same time.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Europe- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, political and local risks of the European region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. Europe includes both developed and emerging markets. Most Western European countries are members of the European Union, which imposes restrictions on inflation rates, deficits and debt levels. Both developed and emerging market countries in Europe will be significantly affected by the fiscal and monetary controls of the European Monetary Union. Changes in regulations on trade, decreasing imports or exports, changes in the exchange rate of the euro and recessions among European countries may have a significant adverse effect on the economies – 4 – of other European countries including those of Eastern Europe. The markets in Eastern Europe remain relatively undeveloped and can be particularly sensitive to political and economic developments. The European financial markets have recently experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about rising government debt levels of certain European countries, each of which may require external assistance to meet its obligations and run the risk of default on its debt, possible bail-out by the rest of the European Union or debt restructuring. Assistance given to a European Union member state may be dependent on a country’s implementation of reforms in order to curb the risk of default on its debt, and a failure to implement these reforms or increase revenues could result in a deep economic downturn. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and therefore may adversely affect the Fund and its investments.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Pacific Rim- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, regulatory, political, natural disasters and local risks of the Pacific Rim region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. The Pacific Rim region includes countries in all stages of economic development; however, it has a higher prevalence of emerging market countries as compared to other regions of the world. The region has historically been highly dependent on global trade, with nations taking strong roles in both the importing and exporting of goods; such a relationship creates a risk with this dependency on global growth. The respective stock markets tend to have a larger prevalence of smaller capitalization companies. Varying levels of accounting and disclosure standards, restrictions on foreign ownership, minority ownership rights, and corporate governance standards are also common for the region.
  • Emerging Market Risk- Many of the risks with respect to foreign investments are more pronounced for investments in issuers in developing or emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have less government exchange controls, more volatile interest and currency exchange rates, less market regulation, and less developed economic, political and legal systems than those of more developed countries. In addition, emerging market countries may experience high levels of inflation and may have less liquid securities markets and less efficient trading and settlement systems.
  • Foreign Sovereign Risk- Foreign governments rely on taxes and other revenue sources to pay interest and principal on their debt obligations. The payment of principal and interest on these obligations may be adversely affected by a variety of factors, including economic results within the foreign country, changes in interest and exchange rates, changes in debt ratings, changing political sentiments, legislation, policy changes, a limited tax base or limited revenue sources, natural disasters, or other economic or credit problems.
  • Credit Risk- If an issuer or guarantor of a debt security held by the Fund or a counterparty to a financial contract with the Fund defaults or is downgraded or is perceived to be less creditworthy, or if the value of the assets underlying a security declines, the value of the Fund’s portfolio will typically decline. Junk bonds have a higher risk of default than other fixed income securities and are considered predominantly speculative.
  • Interest Rate Risk- Generally fixed income securities decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall, with longer-term securities being more sensitive than shorter-term securities. For example, the price of a security with an eight-year duration would be expected to drop by approximately 8% in response to a 1% increase in interest rates. Generally, the longer the maturity and duration of a bond or fixed rate loan, the more sensitive it is to this risk. Falling interest rates also create the potential for a decline in a Fund’s income. These risks are greater during periods of rising inflation.
  • Liquidity Risk- The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value. High Yield (“Junk”) Bond Risk. High yield bonds are debt securities rated below investment grade (often called “junk bonds”). Junk bonds are speculative, involve greater risks of default, downgrade, or price declines and are more volatile and tend to be less liquid than investment-grade securities. Companies issuing high yield bonds are less financially strong, are more likely to encounter financial difficulties, and are more vulnerable to adverse market events and negative sentiments than companies with higher credit ratings.
  • Asset-Backed Securities Risk- Asset-backed securities may be sensitive to changes in interest rates and subject to early repayment risk, and their value may fluctuate in response to the market’s perception of issuer creditworthiness. While such securities are generally supported by some form of government or private guarantee there is no assurance that private guarantors will meet their obligations.
  • Derivatives Risk- Derivatives include instruments and contracts that are based on and valued in relation to one or more underlying securities, financial benchmarks or indices, such as futures, options, swaps and forward contracts. Using derivatives can have a leveraging effect and increase fund volatility. Derivatives can be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the Fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the Fund’s other investments. Many of the risks applicable to trading the instruments underlying derivatives are also applicable to derivatives trading. However, additional risks are associated with derivatives trading that are possibly greater than the risks associated with investing directly in the underlying instruments. These additional risks include but are not limited to illiquidity risk, operational leverage risk and counterparty credit risk. A small investment in derivatives could have a potentially large impact on the Fund’s performance. Recent legislation in the United States calls for new regulation of the derivatives markets. The extent and impact of the regulation are not yet fully known and may not be for some time. New regulation of derivatives may make them more costly, may limit their availability, or may otherwise adversely affect their value or performance.
  • Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk- The securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements and may have lower trading volumes or more erratic trading than securities of larger, more established companies or market averages in general. In addition, such companies typically are more likely to be adversely affected than large capitalization companies by changes in earning results, business prospects, investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions.
  • Large-Cap Company Risk- Larger, more established companies may be unable to attain the high growth rates of successful, smaller companies during periods of economic expansion. Management and Strategy Risk. The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Fund’s advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Fund’s advisor in selecting investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments. 

EuroPac Gold Fund 

  • Market Risk. The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.
  • Equity Risk- The value of the equity securities held by the Fund may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities held by the Fund participate, or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests. Risks Related to the Gold and Precious Metals Industry. The Fund may be subject to greater risks and market fluctuations than a fund whose portfolio has exposure to a broader range of industries or sectors. Investments related to gold and other precious metals are considered speculative and are affected by a variety of worldwide economic, financial and political factors. The price of gold and other precious metals may fluctuate sharply over short periods of time, even during periods of rising prices, due to changes in inflation or expectations regarding inflation in various countries, the availability of supplies, changes in industrial and commercial demand, limited markets, fabricator demand, gold sales by governments, trade imbalances and restrictions, currency devaluation or revaluation, central banks or international agencies, investment speculation, inability to raise capital, increases in production costs, political unrest in nations where sources of precious metals are located, monetary and other economic policies of various governments and government restrictions on private ownership of precious metals and mining land. Therefore, markets are volatile at times, and there may be sharp fluctuations in prices even during periods of rising prices. The metals industry can be significantly affected by events relating to international political developments, the success of exploration projects, commodity prices and tax and government regulations.
  • Foreign Investment Risk- The prices of foreign securities may be more volatile than the prices of securities of U.S. issuers because of economic and social conditions abroad, political developments, and changes in the regulatory environment of foreign countries. In addition, changes in exchange rates and interest rates may adversely affect the value of the Fund’s foreign investments. Foreign companies are generally subject to different legal and accounting standards than U.S. companies, and foreign financial intermediaries may be subject to less supervision and regulation than U.S. financial firms. Foreign securities include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). Unsponsored ADRs involve additional risks because U.S. reporting requirements do not apply and the issuing bank will recover shareholder distribution costs from movement of share prices and payment of dividends.
  • Currency Risk- The value of investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increases or decreases as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. Dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be – 4 – volatile and are affected by factors such as general economic conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls, and speculation.
  • Geographic Concentration Risk- A fund that is less diversified across countries or geographic regions is generally riskier than a more geographically diversified fund. Investments in a single region, even though representing a number of different countries within the region, may be affected by common economic forces and other factors. This vulnerability to factors affecting the value of investments is significantly greater for a fund that concentrates its investment in a particular region or regions than a more geographically diversified fund, and may result in greater losses and volatility. The economies and financial markets of certain regions, such as Latin America, Asia or Eastern Europe, can be interdependent and may decline all at the same time.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Europe- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, political and local risks of the European region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. Europe includes both developed and emerging markets. Most Western European countries are members of the European Union, which imposes restrictions on inflation rates, deficits and debt levels. Both developed and emerging market countries in Europe will be significantly affected by the fiscal and monetary controls of the European Monetary Union. Changes in regulations on trade, decreasing imports or exports, changes in the exchange rate of the euro and recessions among European countries may have a significant adverse effect on the economies of other European countries including those of Eastern Europe. The markets in Eastern Europe remain relatively undeveloped and can be particularly sensitive to political and economic developments. The European financial markets have recently experienced volatility and adverse trends due to concerns about rising government debt levels of certain European countries, each of which may require external assistance to meet its obligations and run the risk of default on its debt, possible bail-out by the rest of the European Union or debt restructuring. Assistance given to a European Union member state may be dependent on a country’s implementation of reforms in order to curb the risk of default on its debt, and a failure to implement these reforms or increase revenues could result in a deep economic downturn. These events have adversely affected the exchange rate of the euro and therefore may adversely affect the Fund and its investments.
  • Geographic Risk Related to Pacific Rim- The Fund will be more susceptible to the economic, market, regulatory, political, natural disasters and local risks of the Pacific Rim region than a fund that is more geographically diversified. The Pacific Rim region includes countries in all stages of economic development; however, it has a higher prevalence of emerging market countries as compared to other regions of the world. The region has historically been highly dependent on global trade, with nations taking strong roles in both the importing and exporting of goods; such a relationship creates a risk with this dependency on global growth. The respective stock markets tend to have a larger prevalence of smaller capitalization companies. Varying levels of accounting and disclosure standards, restrictions on foreign ownership, minority ownership rights, and corporate governance standards are also common for the region.
  • Emerging Market Risk- Many of the risks with respect to foreign investments are more pronounced for investments in issuers in developing or emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have less government exchange controls, more volatile interest and currency exchange rates, less market regulation, and less developed economic, political and legal systems than those of more developed countries. In addition, emerging market countries may experience high levels of inflation and may have less liquid securities markets and less efficient trading and settlement systems.
  • Micro-Cap, Small-Cap or Mid-Cap Company Risk- The securities of small-capitalization and mid-capitalization companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements and may have lower trading volumes or more erratic trading than securities of larger, more established companies or market averages in general. In addition, such companies typically are more likely to be adversely affected than large capitalization companies by changes in earning results, business prospects, investor expectations or poor economic or market conditions. Risks Affecting Specific Issuers. The value of an equity security may decline in response to developments affecting a specific issuer, even if the overall industry or economy is unaffected. These developments may include a variety of factors, such as management problems or corporate disruption, declines in revenues and increases in costs, and factors that affect the issuer’s competitive position.
  • Options Risk- Purchasing and writing put and call options are highly specialized activities and entail greater than ordinary investment risks. The Fund may not fully benefit from or may lose money on an option if changes in its value do not correspond as anticipated to changes in the value of the underlying securities. If the Fund is not able to sell an option held in its portfolio, it would have to exercise the option to realize any profit and would incur transaction costs upon the purchase or sale of the underlying securities. Ownership of options involves the payment of premiums, which may adversely affect the Fund’s performance. To the extent that the Fund invests in over-the-counter options, the Fund may be exposed to counterparty risk.
  • Covered Call Options Risk- The Fund may write (sell) covered call options on securities the Fund holds in its portfolio. This strategy is designed to generate additional gains from option premiums, but also results in certain risks. With respect to portfolio holdings on which the Fund has written a covered call option, the Fund will forgo the opportunity to benefit from potential increases in the value of that security, but will continue to bear the risk of declines in the value of the security.
  • ETF Risk- Investing in an ETF will provide the Fund with exposure to the securities comprising the index on which the ETF is based and will expose the Fund to risks similar to those of investing directly in those securities. Shares of ETFs typically trade on securities exchanges and may at times trade at a premium or discount to their net asset values. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held. Investing in ETFs, which are investment companies, may involve duplication of advisory fees and certain other expenses. The Fund will pay brokerage commissions in connection with the purchase and sale of shares of ETFs. Liquidity Risk. The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value.
  • Tax Risk- In order to qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to regulated investment companies, the Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income in each taxable year from certain categories of income (“qualifying income”). Certain of the Fund’s investments may generate income that is not qualifying income. If the Fund were to fail to meet the qualifying income test and fail to qualify as a regulated investment company, it would be taxed in the same manner as an ordinary corporation, and distributions to its shareholders would not be deductible by the Fund in computing its taxable income.
  • Management and Strategy Risk- The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Fund’s advisor or sub-advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Fund’s advisor or sub-advisor in selecting investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments. 

Europac Emerging Markets Small Companies Fund

  • Market Risk- The market price of a security or instrument may decline, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably, due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions throughout the world, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. The market value of a security or instrument also may decline because of factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry.
  • Equity Risk- The value of the equity securities held by the Fund may fall due to general market and economic conditions, perceptions regarding the industries in which the issuers of securities held by the Fund participate, or factors relating to specific companies in which the Fund invests.
  • Foreign Investment Risk- The prices of foreign securities may be more volatile than the prices of securities of U.S. issuers because of economic and social conditions abroad, political developments, and changes in the – 2 – regulatory environment of foreign countries. In addition, changes in exchange rates and interest rates may adversely affect the values of the Fund’s foreign investments. Foreign companies are generally subject to different legal and accounting standards than U.S. companies, and foreign financial intermediaries may be subject to less supervision and regulation than U.S. financial firms.
  • Currency Risk- The values of investments in securities denominated in foreign currencies increase or decrease as the rates of exchange between those currencies and the U.S. Dollar change. Currency conversion costs and currency fluctuations could erase investment gains or add to investment losses. Currency exchange rates can be volatile and are affected by factors such as general economic conditions, the actions of the U.S. and foreign governments or central banks, the imposition of currency controls, and speculation.
  • Geographic Concentration Risk- A fund that is less diversified across countries or geographic regions is generally riskier than a more geographically diversified fund. Investments in a single region, even though representing a number of different countries within the region, may be affected by common economic forces and other factors. This vulnerability to factors affecting the value of investments is significantly greater for a fund that concentrates its investment in a particular region or regions than a more geographically diversified fund, and may result in greater losses and volatility. The economies and financial markets of certain regions, such as Latin America, Asia or Eastern Europe, can be interdependent and may decline all at the same time.
  • Emerging Market Risk- Many of the risks with respect to foreign investments are more pronounced for investments in issuers in developing or emerging market countries. Emerging market countries tend to have less government exchange controls, more volatile interest and currency exchange rates, less market regulation, and less developed economic, political and legal systems than those of more developed countries. In addition, emerging market countries may experience high levels of inflation and may have less liquid securities markets and less efficient trading and settlement systems.
  • Asia Region Risk- Because the Fund’s sub-advisor intends to focus the Fund’s Asia Region investments in China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, the Fund’s performance may be affected by political, economic, social and religious instability within these countries and the region. The Asian region, and particularly China, Japan and South Korea, may be adversely affected by political, military, economic and other factors related to North Korea. In addition, China’s long running conflict over Taiwan, border disputes with many of its neighbors and historically strained relations with Japan could adversely impact economies in the region. The economies of many Asian countries differ from the economies of more developed countries in many respects.
  • Latin America Region Risk- Because the Fund’s sub-advisor intends to focus the Fund’s Latin America Region investments in Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Peru and Chile, the Fund’s performance may be affected by social, political, and economic conditions within these countries and the region. In addition, the economy of each of these countries is generally characterized by high interest, inflation and unemployment rates. Currency fluctuations or devaluations in any country in the region can have a significant effect on the entire region. Because commodities such as agricultural products, minerals, oil, and metals represent a significant percentage of exports of many Latin American countries, the economies of those countries are particularly sensitive to fluctuations in commodity prices, currencies and global demand for commodities.
  • Small Company Risk- Investments in securities of small capitalization companies may involve greater risks than investing in large capitalization companies because small sized companies generally have limited track records and their shares tend to trade infrequently or in limited volumes. Additionally, investment in common stocks, particularly small sized company stocks, can be volatile and cause the value of the Fund’s shares to go up and down, sometimes dramatically.
  • Preferred Stock Risk- Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stock, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. The market value of preferred stock is subject to company-specific and market risks applicable generally to equity securities and is also sensitive to changes in the company’s creditworthiness, the ability of the company to make payments on the preferred stock, and changes in interest rates, typically declining in value if interest rates rise.
  • Convertible Securities Risk- Convertible securities are subject to market and interest rate risk and credit risk. When the market price of the equity security underlying a convertible security decreases the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its yield and other fixed income characteristics, and is more susceptible to credit and interest rate risks. When the market price of such equity security rises, the convertible security tends to trade on the basis of its equity conversion features and be more exposed to market risk. Convertible securities are typically issued by smaller capitalized companies with stock prices that may be more volatile than those of other companies.
  • Warrants Risk- Warrants may lack a liquid secondary market for resale. The prices of warrants may fluctuate as a result of speculation or other factors. Warrants can provide a greater potential for profit or loss than an equivalent investment in the underlying security. Prices of warrants do not necessarily move in tandem with the prices of their underlying securities and therefore are highly volatile and speculative investments.
  • Liquidity Risk- The Fund may not be able to sell some or all of the investments that it holds due to a lack of demand in the marketplace or other factors such as market turmoil, or if the Fund is forced to sell an illiquid asset to meet redemption requests or other cash needs it may only be able to sell those investments at a loss. Illiquid assets may also be difficult to value.
  • Management and Strategy Risk- The value of your investment depends on the judgment of the Fund’s advisor or sub-advisor about the quality, relative yield, value or market trends affecting a particular security, industry, sector or region, which may prove to be incorrect. Investment strategies employed by the Fund’s advisor or sub-advisor in selecting investments for the Fund may not result in an increase in the value of your investment or in overall performance equal to other investments.

Investment Risk

Please read about the Risks of investing in the Funds. You should carefully consider the Fund's investment objectives, risk, charges and expenses before investing.
To obtain a prospectus or summary prospectus that contains this and other information about the Funds, please Click Here or call 1-888-558-5851. Please read the prospectus carefully before investing.
Euro Pacific Asset Management Funds are distributed by IMST Distributors LLC.

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